Henriette Brasseur  


Mesquite Sand Dune - Death Valley National Park by Henriette Brasseur

January 2022 - Mesquite Sand Dune - Death Valley National Park

January 2022 - Henriette Brasseur

Original

About the Image(s)

The image was taken in Death Valley National Park of the Mesquite Sand Dunes as the sun was setting. The original image was shot at 1 1/3 stops overexposed in order to get maximum detail without overexposing the highlights. This way, in post processing, I could recover all the detail that was in the image. In the past, if there was color in the image (for example, a field of yellow grass, I would overexpose 2/3 stops to render the yellow as the eye saw the grasses. However, often now I will overexpose an image 2/3 to 1 1/3 stops over in general to get maximum detail and not just for the color. I have found out that you are underexposing an image if you take it at middle gray even though you can recover quite a bit doing it that way in post processing.


2 comments posted




Ian Cambourne   Ian Cambourne
Congratulations on your photography Henriette. I'm really glad you are becoming a "thinking photographer" rather than many who just "point and click". Having a vision of how you want your resultant image to be is the best way to commence. Your final image shows you have followed through with your thinking. Great details, colours, use of the elements and depth all result in a very successful image. Some may say they would like to see the sky in the far distance, but for my thinking not necessarily. To me, this image is all about the sand and textures in the foreground and the desolation or the environment. Great image Henriette.   Posted: 01/13/2022 02:42:25



Henriette Brasseur   Henriette Brasseur
Thanks Ian for your comments and for seeing what I was trying to convey. I came upon this scene late afternoon and waited for the right light to emphasize the beautiful lines, textures, shadows, etc. Difficult at times, I have learned to become more disciplined, not running all over the place trying to get a lot of images but instead to concentrate on one scene that is aesthetically pleasing with the idea of discovering the design elements contained within the scene. Again, thank you Ian.   Posted: 01/15/2022 20:15:29



 

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