Marge Barham  


Whipped to the Finish by Marge Barham

November 2021 - Whipped to the Finish

About the Image(s)

November's Photo . . .
Whipped to the Finish ~ Nov 21 by Marge Barham
I love the riders passion while Barrel Racing in rodeos but never realized before looking at some older photos just what it takes to get there.
Taken a few years ago with my Canon 60D, 100-400mm lens at 160mm, f7.1, 1/000sec, ISO 400.


13 comments posted




Regine Guillemin
Great action shot! congrats! but I know what a judge would say looking at this picture. Next time try a wider aperture to get a blurry background because her the background is too busy . but I admire your skill to be able to freeze and pan the action . the horse is almost flying..   Posted: 11/08/2021 15:24:10
Marge Barham   Marge Barham
Thank you Regine. I was thinking the "flying horse" might out weigh the background but I see it as very distracting now. I also thought it was important to keep the guy with the finish flag in the photo. Thanks for your comments and help.   Posted: 11/16/2021 19:57:50



Art Jacoby   Art Jacoby
I like the fact that all the hoofs are off the ground and the detail in the subject. I agree with Regine. I think that you could use more space in the front, crop more tightly and add the rest of the tail. I blurred and darkened the background, brightened the shadows and used Topaz Clarity to increase the contrast and saturation.   Posted: 11/08/2021 21:36:54
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Regine Guillemin
wow !!! you did an interesting job blurring the background . and thank you for improving my vocabulary. I was looking for this expression, earlier ... The Hoofs off the ground ..   Posted: 11/08/2021 22:09:34
Art Jacoby   Art Jacoby
It was a photographer, Muybridge, who proved that at a gallop all of a horses hoofs are off the ground   Posted: 11/09/2021 21:25:40
Regine Guillemin
Yes I have heard of this well known photographer . long time ago i saw an exhibit at the Corcoran . But i didn't remember this expression. thanks again   Posted: 11/10/2021 01:38:10
Marge Barham   Marge Barham
Thank you Art. Your editing was very necessary. All four hoofs off the ground is the only reason I liked this photo, and the guy about to flag the finish was also important to me. I guess I'm just not seeing the way you guys do.
You still did a great job blurring the background and I will try working on it. Thanks again.   Posted: 11/16/2021 20:03:34



Sylvia Bacon   Sylvia Bacon
Marge, what a great picture! And, you did a terrific job of capturing the horse just at the right time in mid-gallop! Blurring the background along with dodging and burning as Art did helped to draw more attention to the horse and rider. Although, I have a feeling that selecting and moving the subject to a different background would really make this a fabulous image. I love your picture!   Posted: 11/10/2021 10:30:14
Marge Barham   Marge Barham
Thank you Sylvia. I agree with blurring the background but I hate taking away the guy about to flag the finish. I do appreciate your idea and will start looking for other background to try. Thanks again   Posted: 11/16/2021 20:10:56



Kurtis Sutley   Kurtis Sutley
In my opinion you did a great job capturing/freezing the action. I have no doubt you realize the distraction of the background. I would personally recommend trying a slower shutter speed to add enough blur to convey speed and accent the action. Rodeos can be tricky and many times shooting positions may be restrictive, but if you can, shooting from a three-quarter front angle will capture both horse and rider's facial expressions better. To me the flowing mane and tail does help convey a sense of speed. When searching for that shooting position, don't forget to consider sun angle. The loss of detail could have been avoided if the shot had been taken as she raced to the third and final barrel with the sun in her face. That position would have afforded you the chance to get her coming around the second barrel. (Just some things to think about next time.)   Posted: 11/15/2021 07:44:19
Marge Barham   Marge Barham
Thank you Kurtis. As I mentioned above I thought it was more important to show the guy about to flag the first place winner across the line and the background will just be the background. I was totally wrong. No one picked up on the guy with the flag at the finish line and everyone worried about the background. It a good lesson for me from you and the others. Thanks.
Would you take a moment and look at this photo and give me your opinion?
  Posted: 11/16/2021 20:16:20
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Kurtis Sutley   Kurtis Sutley
This is really close. It's a really nice capture. One thing about panning shots is your success rate is going to be very low. The shutter speed has to be slow enough to blur every thing but the less moving aspects of the subject. In this one the legs of the rider are a bit too blurred (not by much) but the sense of speed is real. I'm thinking the rider has completed the ride because she's too upright in the saddle. One other consideration of shooting a panning shot of barrel racers; There aren't that many opportunities at most rodeos to practice your technique. You might look for pure barrel racing events in your area where multiple runs are made. Back to the image...Your composition is very nice. You've left room for the horse to run into and it's level. You made this image at ground level which improves the background. Also, shooting at a faster f/stop will make blurring the foreground and background easier. This is usually necessary anyway because most arenas have horrible lighting. Getting to shoot outside during the day is a rare treat. Again, don't forget to minimize facial shadows when possible. Except for the rider's posture, I like this image better and you got all hooves off the ground. Brutal honesty alert: Unless he's related, no one cares about the flag man. In fact, most people don't even know he's there as a backup since they use electric eye timers. Somewhere in the arena there's a guy with a stop watch who's watching the flag man. Last but not least, the background needs to be darker to isolate the subject a little more. Since parts of the subject and the back/foreground are intentionally blurred, it's important to isolate the subject. How much? Enough so the subject isn't lost. The lighter arena surface really helps in this image but there will be times the arena surface is darker.   Posted: 11/17/2021 08:40:23
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Marge Barham   Marge Barham
Wow, thank you Kurtis. I do appreciate your comments and your time. What you did is great!!!
  Posted: 11/17/2021 20:34:39



 

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