Kieu-Hanh Vu  


Fun Race by Kieu-Hanh Vu

July 2021 - Fun Race

About the Image(s)

This image was taken last month at the Armed Forces Cycling Classic in VA. I used the panning technique to capture the motion of the cyclist.

Canon 7D Mark II, Tamron lens 18-400mm, ISO 125, F/16.0, Speed 1/40, handheld.


This round’s discussion is now closed!
23 comments posted




Michael Hrankowski   Michael Hrankowski
Hi Kieu-Hanh! I really like your image. You've managed to really capture the sense of speed and motion. I particularly like how 98% of the image is speed-blur, but her face and head are sharp. My only suggestion would be to bring down the highlights and whites and increase the saturation. I brought your image into Photoshop and used the Camera Raw Filter. Highlights -100; Shadows -15; Whites -100; Blacks -70. I also increased the saturation of the reds and blues and decreased slightly the luminance of those two colors. Curious what you think.   Posted: 07/05/2021 20:33:14
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Kieu-Hanh Vu   Kieu-Hanh Vu
Your edits made the background look nicer. I should enhance the saturation in each separate color as you did instead of doing it globally. I really like it! Thanks, Michael for your tips!   Posted: 07/06/2021 23:40:01



Mary Ann Carrasco   Mary Ann Carrasco
Hi Kieu-Hanh. This is a great photo of motion. I agree with Michael as to taking down the highlights and whites as the my eye tends to focus on the brightest areas. Great capture!   Posted: 07/06/2021 14:36:16



Ruth Sprain   Ruth Sprain
Kieu-Hanh, I really like the use of panning for your action shot. The placement of the bike on the right side works well too. I do like Michael's version with bringing down the highlights. Another option is to make your photo a high key image by lightening the background, particularly on the left side and right side corners.   Posted: 07/07/2021 16:50:05
Kieu-Hanh Vu   Kieu-Hanh Vu
Thanks everyone in our group for your comments.

Ruth,
It's interesting to know that making a high key image can lighten the background in this case. I will definitely try it. Thanks!   Posted: 07/13/2021 18:59:45



Randolph Shine   Randolph Shine
Well done. I love panning shots because they convey so much more information that a still photo. It was a bright sunny day and your focus was spot on. I agree that Michael's re-processing of the photo did enhance the over all photo.   Posted: 07/10/2021 10:56:24



Lisa Cirincione   Lisa Cirincione
Great panning shot, especially with Michael's edit toning down the background. Great colors in the biker and they dont clash with any colors in the background. Good job   Posted: 07/13/2021 15:24:49



Lisa Cirincione   Lisa Cirincione
Great panning shot, especially with Michael's edit toning down the background. Great colors in the biker and they dont clash with any colors in the background. Good job   Posted: 07/13/2021 15:24:50



LuAnn Thatcher   LuAnn Thatcher
What a fun event this must have been, Kieu-Hahn, to photograph a bike race.

I do agree with everyone the highlights are way overexposed. Even bringing them down makes the cyclist's arms look like plastic from the harsh light. I suspect you could have used a little faster shutter to compensate for the bright exposure.

One tip is to set your camera in full auto and see what settings the camera chooses for the light; then, you could fine-tune the settings for your event.

Second, do you use an exposure meter on your camera LCD screen? This meter is helpful to know when your exposure is too far to the right. Overexposed highlights can sometimes be unrecoverable. Learning about this problem ahead of time can give you a chance to fix it before the race. Sometimes if you can find a place with a bit of shade also helps.

Lastly, when panning, pre-focus the lens on an area where the racer will pass by. Choose a shutter speed of 1/200th of a second to begin with, and follow the subject in a smooth horizontal motion while pressing the shutter button. You can use a tripod for a clean pan or plant your feet firmly and twist from the waist only following the racer. This method will assure a sharp racer and nice blur background.

I hope this helps,

LT

  Posted: 07/19/2021 14:47:16
Kieu-Hanh Vu   Kieu-Hanh Vu
LuAnn, Thanks for your comments! For sport shooting, I don't use exposure meter. It's just a "hit or miss" type of shooting because each racer's speed is different.
I'd want to see your panning images to learn more on this technique.   Posted: 07/22/2021 23:41:36
LuAnn Thatcher   LuAnn Thatcher
Great idea to discuss panning photography, Kieu-Hanh!

Panning techniques will vary from photographer to photographer. You don't have to take my word on how to pan. Below I have listed four experts, and they all are giving different advice on panning.

But please let the group know how you took your shot:
How do you control exposure if you don't use the exposure meter?
When handholding, what was your panning technique? I noticed you did not mention any details about this in the photo description.

From the articles noted below, I noticed these photographers used shutter speeds from 1/4 second to 1/200. The technique will be different for everyone and their situation.

Canon
https://www.canon.co.uk/get-inspired/tips-and-techniques/panning/

Canon Asia - Studio 9
https://snapshot.canon-asia.com/article/en/camera-settings-to-use-for-awesome-slow-shutter-shots

David Black - Nikon Ambassador - professional sports photographer
https://www.nikonusa.com/en/learn-and-explore/a/tips-and-techniques/10-tips-for-better-camera-panning.html

https://digital-photography-school.com/the-art-of-panning/

I am hopeful from this list of experts; you will find what will work for your unique panning style.

Best regards,
LT

  Posted: 07/23/2021 09:25:46
Michael Hrankowski   Michael Hrankowski
LuAnn, thanks for the references. As far as any input for Kieu-Hanh, I'm afraid I've got nothing to offer. I don't do sports photography. I've tried panning for some bird photography - with decidedly mixed results - so perhaps those articles will help me too.   Posted: 07/23/2021 09:48:11
Ruth Sprain   Ruth Sprain
I have done some sports photography with panning, particularly at the Bolder Boulder where 50,000 runners and walkers participate in a 10K race. I choose the spot carefully to get a background with few distractions and in consistent shade. I use a tripod set to move smoothly from right to left.   Posted: 07/23/2021 14:04:50
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Mary Ann Carrasco   Mary Ann Carrasco
What I learned to do panning is to use the shutter speed that corresponds to your focal length....for example, if you are at 24mm you would use a shutter speed of about 1/125 and you adjust the aperture for the exposure. And the trick is to track the moving object at the same speed it is traveling on continuous. I learned this in a class from a Youtube video called "5 Easy in Camera Effects for 2019 - without Props" by Pierre Lambert. It near the end of the video and he calls it tracking. I used it for my class assignment and it worked pretty well. It is something I would like to practice.   Posted: 07/23/2021 17:53:35
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LuAnn Thatcher   LuAnn Thatcher
Great photo, Mary Ann! I love the classic car and the pose of the driver; both are classics. I will have to check out your video link I like your technique. Again, this image in the shade helped make a nice image. Not every situation can provide shade, but it is something to consider when planning the event.

Great discussion!

LT   Posted: 07/24/2021 16:05:27
LuAnn Thatcher   LuAnn Thatcher
I like your shot also, Ruth. The runner in the middle is clearly in focus and the two on either side have a nice soft motion blur. Nicely done. You have a good point about finding some shade from the bright sun really makes a noticeable difference.

LT   Posted: 07/24/2021 15:59:30
Kieu-Hanh Vu   Kieu-Hanh Vu
Thanks LuAnn for providing the references for panning technique, and thanks everyone for joining the discussion.
For my image, I usually set my camera in Manual mode, AI Servo for focus mode. I tested some shots and found that at speed 1/40 for my lens, I can get the motion blur of the race but the rider's face is quite clear. I panned my camera slowly following the direction of the racer. In this case, it's from right to left.
I like to experiment with different techniques. Sometimes, I captured the freeze motion with high speed, sometimes I used panning technique with slower speed, and sometimes I used zoom burst by turning my lens while shooting when the whole group of racers coming out at starting point. It's kind of fun to do so!
I did bring my tripod but I cannot use it because there are fences or barricades at the race area, and there are a lot of people around too.   Posted: 07/24/2021 13:28:15
LuAnn Thatcher   LuAnn Thatcher
I appreciate hearing the technique you used for panning this shot. There are many variables to consider for action photography. I used to shoot Muay Thai events, but there it was, more stop-action ringside captures.

This has been a great discussion. I think everyone except Michael and Randy has given action a try at some point. Thanks for making this a good conversation for the group.

LT   Posted: 07/24/2021 16:14:40
Michael Hrankowski   Michael Hrankowski
LuAnn, thanks for the references. As far as any input for Kieu-Hanh, I'm afraid I've got nothing to offer. I don't do sports photography. I've tried panning for some bird photography - with decidedly mixed results - so perhaps those articles will help me too.   Posted: 07/24/2021 21:16:16



Lisa Cirincione   Lisa Cirincione
I've only had one successful panning shot… from a workshop a few years back in Paris. I don't remember all of the instruction but the main thing was to follow smoothly and have something be in focus. In my shot I was lucky that the biker looked at me and I got focus on his face.   Posted: 07/23/2021 18:33:56
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LuAnn Thatcher   LuAnn Thatcher
That is a fantastic photo example of panning, Lisa! I love his expression; it shows emotion. I like the smoothness in the background (everything is level), and the exposure is spot-on.

Thanks for sharing so much with the group this month, Lisa! I know you are very busy, so I want to say I appreciate your contributions!!

Take care,

LuAnn   Posted: 07/24/2021 13:36:31
Kieu-Hanh Vu   Kieu-Hanh Vu
Lisa, Great shot! I love the biker's face expression! He seems to tease you when he saw your camera pointing at him.   Posted: 07/24/2021 23:06:23



Kieu-Hanh Vu   Kieu-Hanh Vu
Thanks everyone for sharing your panning shots and your technique! I think that there are various ways to capture the movement, and practice makes perfect.
Some people might think that the motion can be done at post processing, such as using Photoshop. I think that creating a motion blur for the bicycle (for ex, to blur the tires to create motion) could be harder than to do so for the car at the post processing.
  Posted: 07/24/2021 23:21:14