Group 77 What Is Fine Arts?


Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
This forum is a place for us to discuss that inspires us to label an image as "fine art" photography. Please post what that term means to you now. As time goes by, and you find an example or an inspiration that adds to your understanding of "fine art" photography, please continue to post here and dialog on what others have posted. Some questions to consider: Does "fine art" photography require a lot of post-processing? Are there certain techniques that turn an ordinary image into a fine art image? In general, what characteristics impress you about an image, enough to call it "fine art" photography?   Posted: 08/24/2019 18:38:39

Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
My favorite way of thinking about fine art photography (right now), is the following: I ask myself if an image I've created is artistic enough for me to spend over $100. to have it printed and framed and hung in my living room, for all visitors to see.

Although I do occasionally use Topaz Impressions to make one of my photos look like it was painted (thus nominally qualifying as 'fine art'), I'm finding that I prefer to use texture and lighting to add a more arty mood and take away the 'documentary' look of extraneous stuff in the photo.   Posted: 08/24/2019 18:42:51

Connie Reinhart   Connie Reinhart
My immediate thought is that 'fine art photography' must somehow imitate the great masters in painting. But fine art in any medium should elicit emotions in the viewer. The image should do more than record a moment in history. It should somehow reflect the soul of the photographer. Yes, Topaz Studio impressions allows the photographer to add some pizzazz to a photo quickly, but lighting, texture, focus, etc. allow us to do that in a much more personal way.   Posted: 08/24/2019 19:22:08

Witta Priester   Witta Priester
First I’d thought I'd include some background info…

-- From Wikipedia: Fine-art photography is photography created in accordance with the vision of the artist as a photographer, using photography as a medium to bring something to life that only lives in the artist's mind. Simply capturing what one sees in an artistic way is the art of photography and not creating fine art.
-- Ansel Adams once stated, “Art implies control of reality, for reality itself possesses no sense of the aesthetic. Photography becomes art when certain controls are applied.”
-- Fine art (noun) -- definition:
1 .creative art, especially visual art whose products are to be appreciated primarily or solely for their imaginative, aesthetic, or intellectual content."the convergence of popular culture and fine art”.
 2. an activity requiring great skill or accomplishment."he'll have to learn the fine art of persuasion”.
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Like many of you, I’ve been pondering what our group is about. There are a number of definitions of fine art (see above), and as I see it, a number of ways to MAKE fine art photographs. For example:
-- Creating a scene to photograph, often with limited post processing (for example, early Brooke Shaden)
-- Modifying an image with post processing to get a mood or feeling, or to create a painterly look and feel. (Thomas Dodd, https://www.thomasdodd.com/about)
-- Creating and photographing an image specifically with the intent to post-process, thereby amplifying the maker’s vision. For example, from a definition of Photo-illustration ½½½” a type of computer art that begins with a digitized photograph. Using special image enhancement software, the artist can then apply a variety of special effects to transform the photo into a work of art.

Another aspect is about creating a MOOD and atmosphere -- how to capture a scene (or modify it) so that it transports the viewer to another time or place, or evokes a certain feeling that makes them engage with the photo. This might be a feeling of happiness, calmness, sadness, fear, inquisitiveness.

I expect each of us is thinking differently about our “Fine Arts” group, which is good. My first question is: Do you believe there any NECESSARY characteristics or qualities that the images we put into our group should embrace?   Posted: 08/24/2019 20:34:59

Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
I agree about the evocation of emotion/mood being an important part of fine art photography.

As to necessary characteristics, I'd say no, at least not at this time. Perhaps as we progress, we might wish to discuss that further. However, to me, we each need to follow our 'hearts' on this and try to capture and convey what entranced us about the scene we present to our group. It would seem to me that doing so is an artful balance between improving our camera technique, as well as artfully manipulating the captured electrons through post-processing, in a way that conveys what we were feeling about the scene.

What do the rest of your think about "necessary characteristics"?   Posted: 08/24/2019 20:47:25

Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
For a real treat, take a look at this fine art monochrome image by Lance Lewin in Group 83. Then also read his bio. There is a lot of good info in the bio and in his 'how he did it' for his image.
  Posted: 08/24/2019 20:51:03

Mary Hinsen   Mary Hinsen
I work part time as a journalist. The thing I find most challenging is to take images that I must be able to use straight out of the camera - no removal of elements or any post processing, other than a little exposure adjustment if needed.
To me, fine art photography is the polar opposite of this. I visualize a story and create it with a mix of how I set up the shot and subsequent post-processing.
My aim is storytelling with fine art images. I want to evoke emotions and for the viewer to be able to create their own story.
With words and journalistic images I tell the story exactly as I see it - there’s little room for interpretation. Through fine art images I hope to touch emotions and allow the viewer to find their own story.   Posted: 08/25/2019 03:49:44

J. Lanning Smith   J. Lanning Smith
To me, fine art is one that elicits a strong emotional response in the viewer. I'm not sure I can really define it. It's more like --- I know it when I see it.
I subscribe to a newsletter by Julia Anna Gospodarou, who I would define as a fine arts photographer in the architectural field. In fact, she's probably the best. Coincidentally, as we were having this discussion I received her latest letter with this article about the principles of fine art photography: http://blog.juliaannagospodarou.com/fine-art-photography-principles/
I think it's well worth reading. I will never be the artist that she is, but she gives me something to strive toward.
I might also add that what I usually think of as fine art is black and white. And I also like simplicity in what I consider to be fine art. Of course, these are my own preferences, but I do think the simpler the better.   Posted: 08/25/2019 10:14:59
Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Jim, that article is a real find. Thanks for posting the link. I could immediately identify with his first points about the importance of light, both visible and invisible. The former is the light on the scene at the time of the photo. The second is the light one adds in post-processing. When engineers design the algorithms built into the camera, to produce a JPG, they seem to work with just the light that was visible when the photo was taken, which is why JPGs are often flat in appearance. "Flat" most often does not inspire strong emotion. When one shoots in RAW, and then applies the invisible light shifts of post-processing software, photos come to life, using both visible and invisible three dimensional light applications.
  Posted: 08/25/2019 20:59:13
Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Just for the heck of it, and in case some who read this dialog might not see the importance or 'how to' of visual verses invisible light in an image (as in the link to Julia's article, which Jim shared with us), here are some stages of the same image. The dull one is part of an HDR series, and is a 'straight' image, with no software manipulation (not even Camera Raw). It captures only visual light. However, the subject for me is the line up of shrimp boats, pointing out to sea. The subject gets lost using only visual light. So I developed the image in Camera Raw and PS CC, to add 'invisible' light to the subject area. The final image is the second image, with a BW adjustment layer on it. the monochrome really brings out a lot more feeling, in my opinion.   Posted: 08/26/2019 17:30:42
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Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
non-visible light applied in PS CC and Camera Raw   Posted: 08/26/2019 17:30:42
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Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Non-visible light applied, as above, plus a Black/White adjustment layer. To me, this brings out the most feeling of dusk, with the subject of the fishing boat lineup emphasized.   Posted: 08/26/2019 17:30:42
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J. Lanning Smith   J. Lanning Smith
Very nice with the black and white layer.   Posted: 08/26/2019 17:30:42
Witta Priester   Witta Priester
Wow! Thanks for sharing the recent blog post by Julia Anna Gospodarou. A wonderful article. Two of many take aways: 1) Fine art photographs are about emotional communication between the creator and the viewer; 2) Photography is a pretext for the artist to express him or herself.   Posted: 08/25/2019 21:37:42
Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Witta, thanks for your summary of what you took away from Julia's article. The first of your summary points really hit me strongly, due to some things that happened in my past.
At one point in my life, I was doing spiritual counseling via the phone, for clients around the world. For some strange reason, I kept getting connected with artists, all of whom had real doubts about themselves in their chosen careers. When I asked for inner guidance, to assist in answering their questions, one thing came through each time. Summary of that thought: When an artist creates a work of art, they are trying to express their inner experience of something that moved them greatly. When the product of that expression was taken in by a viewer, it was always gratifying to the artist to feel that a connection had been made, at that universal inner place of creativity within each of us. That experience of connection is a form of communication, thus completing a circle of connection between each two. While an artist might just focus on the expression of that inner experience, they are also deeply touched when such a circle is perceived. Communication is so important to us! So keep up the good work!   Posted: 08/26/2019 06:03:04

Witta Priester   Witta Priester
I REALLY LIKE THESE TWO THOUGHTS from Mary.

"I visualize a story and create it with a mix of how I set up the shot and subsequent post-processing."
"Through fine art images I hope to touch emotions and allow the viewer to find their own story"   Posted: 08/25/2019 12:46:30

Connie Reinhart   Connie Reinhart
When it comes to determining whether or not a work is fine art, we must remember that old adage that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Not all oil paintings are masterpieces. My town is home to many amateur artists; local shows and contests were always separated into photography and all other mediums. The advent of digital photography and the wonderful tools we have to work with confused the coordinators of these shows. They felt that manipulation gave some people a great advantage over others. The rules for the photography shows always included "no manipulation other than normal." At the protests of photographers, a new category has been added called 'digital art' or 'fine art photography'. But manipulation doesn't make an image art. Just consider Ansel Adams or Dorothea Lange. Their images would never be considered anything but art. Art must engage the viewer.   Posted: 08/25/2019 15:21:44
Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Ansel Adams was a master manipulator of photography. In fact, his work was not perceived as special until after he discovered the art of manipulation. His media was just different than today's media--chemicals and physical manipulation rather than the post processing software that emulates what he did. Today, if one looks at his famous artwork, but is also familiar with many of today's photo artists, Ansel Adams pales by comparison. Yet, he was a pioneer, and his works are still considered masterpieces, as they should be. Ansel helped to found the Center for Creative Photography, in Tucson, AZ. He would be delighted with today's software, and would probably be writing innovative extensions to it!   Posted: 08/25/2019 20:32:43
Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Still, manipulation as you say, does not make art. Photographs are a starting point for Fine Art Photography. I like to think of photographs as paints on an image palate. We are fortunate that we have so many tools available these days, from what we use to create an image that pleases us through how we sculpt our images into what pleases us as fine art!

Thanks for your comments!   Posted: 08/25/2019 20:40:07

Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
It would seem that a recurring aspect of Fine Art Photography is the conveying of feeling/emotion. One of the competition subjects at one of my former camera clubs, was "Emotion". That befuddled most of us, for we just didn't understand how to deliberately go out to photograph "emotion". Another challenging assignment in an online photography class, was to "photograph the 'light'", where the light is the main subject rather than an object holding out as the subject. Tough! Perhaps it would be a good exercise for us to try to accomplish these two photographic goals!
  Posted: 08/26/2019 09:40:28

J. Lanning Smith   J. Lanning Smith
Google must be paying attention because it just recommended this article to me about defining what fine art is. I thought it pretty good. https://www.thephotoargus.com/fine-art-photography/   Posted: 08/31/2019 13:29:17
Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
What a marvelous article! Thank you so much for sharing it.

I am fascinated by the comments in makes about fine art portraiture. It certainly solves the problem of having to get a model release for a photo that contains people!

Though I've never heard the term 'conceptual' applied to photos, it is what my creative group does. The images shown are quite fantastic.

The author addresses many types of photography, and within each type illustrates the difference between a documentary style and a fine art style. This article is a keeper!

Please stay safe during the approaching hurricane.   Posted: 08/31/2019 13:53:48
J. Lanning Smith   J. Lanning Smith
Thanks Georgianne. You stay safe too; you certainly don't need another hit after last year. The Hilton Head Club had a competition last year that was for "conceptual photography." Prior to the contest, I had not heard the term either. But it did result in some interesting, creative photographs. I'm glad you liked the article. I found it very helpful to me in giving me a better perspective on what fine art photography is.   Posted: 08/31/2019 19:26:28

Bunny Laden   Bunny Laden
I love the dialog in this group!

I just joined a local camera club and the PSA earlier this year. Only this month did I learn of the Fine Arts category, as my club doesn’t use it. It has a Creative category. Thinking that Creative is the same as Fine Arts, I submitted a print and was awarded second place by an external judge. A person from the club came up to me afterwards and said that my photo was certianly deserving of recognition, but he failed to see how it was Creative. Since then, I learned that (in my club) Creative means the expert use of Photoshop to combine two or more layers into an image that could not be created through the camera alone. The sorts of Creative images I see in my club are what I usually refer to as graphics arts.

So what is Fine Art photography? I see it as using the camera to make an image that communicates the unique perspective of the photogarpher. Post processing, to me, is just developing the image and can involve a wide range of approaches and reflects the perspective of the maker.

By being a member of this group, I hope to understand better what Fine Art photography is and how to get better at doing it. What really excites me in photography, are those images considerd to be Fine Arts.

Thanks for the references to the articles. They are terrific.   Posted: 08/31/2019 16:40:27
Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Bunny, it seems as though the definitions of "Creative" and "Fine Art" are still not as firm in the photographic community as some of the other categories. What your club calls "creative" I would call "composite". To me, "creative" is a much broader category, and that category would include "in camera" creative. Still, "in camera" creative is only a start, as we have to develop our own images, and how we develop them is part of the total process!   Posted: 09/01/2019 06:44:36

Witta Priester   Witta Priester
Bunny, another version of creative is "altered reality", which one of my clubs uses. This photo (taken in a Las Vegas hotel hallway) was processed in a creative way. It is clearly creative, as well as altered reality. I think it is also conceptual art, and probably "fine art".   Posted: 09/01/2019 08:53:33
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Witta Priester   Witta Priester
I love this landscape photo by Nathan Wirth -- seems in the vein of Julia Ann Agospodarou, from our earlier discussion.
http://blog.juliaannagospodarou.com/tutorials/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlwirth/48586141922/in/datetaken/   Posted: 09/17/2019 09:46:08

Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
What is your most common process for conceiving and creating a fine art photograph? Do you visualize before starting to photograph and then look for opportunities to capture what you see in your mind's eye with your camera? Do you just start with an old photo, and play until something emerges that you like? How do you prepare yourself to receive inspiration?
  Posted: 09/22/2019 13:43:40

Witta Priester   Witta Priester
Georgianne, I'm so glad you asked these questions, since, like you, I'm currently in the mode of thinking about my art and about fine art. I look forward to seeing your answers and those of our other group members.

As for me, I rarely set out to create a fine art photo, since I tend to photograph whatever comes my way. But since joining this group, I have been looking at my new captures a little differently, asking: Is this the stuff of "fine art"? (I rarely go back to an old photo, except for textures or some part to use in a composite.)

I'm definitely in the "play until something emerges" camp, since I have the skills and enjoy learning new techniques and playing in Photoshop. Oftentimes it's a combination of images from a single day that inspires me. This one combines a photo taken at the pier at dusk, and then fireworks from later that night.

In regards to how to prepare for inspiration, I do regularly look at the work of others -- in magazines and advertisements, on various websites and in newsletters and announcements, in galleries, wherever. Sometimes these images spark an idea -- flip the image upside-down, do a multiple of some sort, think about oblique lines, color spots, etc.

Sometimes one of my photos just grabs me and I wonder how I can make it more pleasing, more powerful, more dramatic, more interesting, more better...   Posted: 09/22/2019 14:54:09
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Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Witta, I really like the image you posted!

I too, have followed the path that you explain: looking at others work, then starting with a photo I like and playing with it until an intriguing direction appears, and then following that path until another fork in possibilities appears.

What got me thinking about that approach, was a rude awakening (literally). I woke with something in my eye, and that escalated into a sinus headache, eye pain, and a drippy nose. So I took some aspirin and an allergy pill, and went back to bed, miserable. Unable to sleep, I turned on a meditation video on my cellphone. It was one that took me with sounds, down the Mississippi River, as if I were a Mark Twain character. In my mind's eye, I saw the rushes, the cattails, the tall waving grasses, the swirling greenish waters, the overhanging trees as I moved down the river. So many memories from my youth came back, pleasantly. My mind and body relaxed and I was filled with appreciation. Visions appeared in my mind, bits and pieces from my past, and I felt like a child again, seeing and appreciating those visions for the first time. I realized that when my mind and body are relaxed, my creative juices started to flow much more abundantly. I could and did visualize something I want to create, from finding the initial place to photograph, through painting it with PS tools, to output a fine art composition.

My training is to learn and use the tools first, and gradually evolve an image into something I like (but others often don't!). I think now I want to practice relaxing and visualizing, and then go on the hunt for a means to bring a visualization into reality! To me, it seems harder that way. But I do have the tools now and need to work on the inspiration!   Posted: 09/22/2019 18:42:51
Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
This is a close approximation of my vision while listening to a Mississipi River sounds meditation today. I found three images in my own collection and put them together, and then applied a Topaz Impressions Georgia OKeefe effect to it, since it needed a 'non-documentary' look to fit my dreamy vision! The 3 images were taken at 3 different South Carolina locations, but they fit well together to construct my vision. I call it Mississippi Dreaming.   Posted: 09/22/2019 21:03:52
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Bunny Laden   Bunny Laden
What a beautiful and restful image!   Posted: 09/22/2019 21:10:26
Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
thanks Bunny. It was reflective of a restful inspiration! However, I can do without the sinus problem in order to convince myself to relax with a meditation!   Posted: 09/22/2019 21:10:26

Mary Hinsen   Mary Hinsen
Thanks Georgianne and Witta for uploading your images - they're great. I like hearing about the creative processes others have ... and I hope you are feeling better Georgianne :)

When I think about it, I have two separate creative processes. Something will spark my imagination, and in my head I imagine a finished image. It can take me a long time - but I slowly identify photos to take that will become the foundation of that image - whether a single scene I construct, or part of a composite. I've uploaded one I've been playing with for a while. I had a vision in my head of how sadness and stress can freeze you. A friend doesn't have to say anything - they just need to be there, silent. So I set up the scene, using flour and two very patient models! It's definitely not finished yet but it's an example of where I've set out to create something I can see in my head.

The other process I have is one where I play with an image that I have taken. The one I submitted this month is an example. I looked at the image SOOC and didn't like it. It documented the scene, but didn't tell the story of how I felt. I live in a small town with open spaces and our home looks out over a lake. It sounds a bit childish to write it down, but when I visited Wellington I felt very small. I just loved looking up at the tall buildings - that's where the space was, not down where I was standing. I processed the image with that feeling in my mind.   Posted: 09/22/2019 23:29:56
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Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Mary, your image of the two friends is so lovely! I'd love to see what that final vision of yours looks like. To me, its current state is quite outstanding. I love the way the eyes and lips are so predominant.

The ability to express what one is feeling is primary for both of your process approaches. I love that you have both. It's sort of like the ability to visualize is the force that brings together all of your experiences and acquired tools in a mish-mash, from which a cohesive product ultimately emerges. That product is then tailored to fit what best expresses your feelings about your vision, be it a pre-vision or one that develops as your work is molded.   Posted: 09/23/2019 07:22:17

Witta Priester   Witta Priester
Georgianne, I love that you were able to create this dreamy image after meditating. A little down time can help creativity come to the fore. This result does indeed seem very much like the vision you described in words...   Posted: 09/23/2019 08:20:55

Connie Reinhart   Connie Reinhart
I rarely take a photograph with fine art as an end goal. I try to get the best result possible from an image. But some images just want more...emotion, making a statement, telling a story. I enjoy music and reading as much as photography, so all three combine when I process. Sometimes I just play and see what happens. While that gives interesting results, they don't always feel 'genuine.' We were at a bed and breakfast hidden in the woods last January. We took our cameras, but the scenes were all grey and drab. The inn keepers were such lovely people that we wanted to give them some pictures. So I played with Topaz filters and came up with some 'daydreaming' images that they were very pleased with - and so was I. They didn't impress my husband, though.   Posted: 09/26/2019 15:23:41
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Bunny Laden   Bunny Laden
I like your image Connie and I can see why your B&B hosts would enjoy this as well. I am at the PSA conference in Spokane. Last night Cole Thompson spoke about finding one’s vision and the importantce of creating images that pleased himself without regard to others. So I am glad to see that you created an image that pleases you!   Posted: 09/26/2019 22:49:28

Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Thanks Connie. The composition of your image is lovely.

It's interesting that you are inspired by music and reading, as well as photography. In my opinion, everything that triggers the creative impulses within, contributes in its own way to what we can create.

Years ago, I met a man who saw colors when he heard music. Apparently, there are many people who have that same mental gift. Reading what you wrote and seeing your image reminded me of him. He was actually a teacher, who was trying to get his students to visualize to music.

When I was in grade school, we were taught something similar. After teaching us various artistic techniques, we were placed in several situations, including one with our eyes closed, in which we were told to create a picture while listening to music. I loved those classes!   Posted: 09/26/2019 18:30:21

Karen Smalley   Karen Smalley
This is an image I took on a workshop I was on .. Was my first attempt at doing this style of photography .. This was using a model in portraiture I will post the initial image that was taken first ... I put this into my photography societies competition on Tuesday evening and the judge said it was a cracking image of the male model .. etc etc but HATED the background .. Sadly on this shoot I had no choice but to use the background that was set up ,, the positioning and where the model looked and where he had his hands etc , was down to whoever the photographer was standing in front of him .. but I got back in and Wednesday I thought what could I do to ' improve this image .. I would love to hear what other members of this group think of the image before I post my end result ; o ) xx   Posted: 09/27/2019 10:26:47
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J. Lanning Smith   J. Lanning Smith
Karen, I love this image just as it is. No need to do anything to improve it. Well done!   Posted: 09/27/2019 18:26:56

Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Karen, it is a "cracking" great image, in my opinion. If you want to do something to it, my thought is to slightly lighten the background and to very slightly tone down the bright spot under the figures right eye, on the side of the cheekbone.

Those suggestions are just for something alternative to try, though I think the image stands well as it is.   Posted: 09/27/2019 11:29:58

Karen Smalley   Karen Smalley
Many thanks for your wonderful comments .. this is the image I have now ended up with after listening to the judges comments on Tuesday evenings first competition of the season
Please excuse watermark as only responding on my phone at the moment and this is an image I’ve got off my Facebook   Posted: 09/28/2019 02:08:15
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J. Lanning Smith   J. Lanning Smith
Excellent! I thought it was perfect before, but I agree that this one is even better. Nice job!   Posted: 09/28/2019 17:13:15
Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
I agree with Jim. I like this even better. The classic background, in a brighter contrast, really makes this look better to me. Perhaps that is because of my age/life experience of seeing classical looking stuff before the more modern textural look.

What was your process in the total creation of this final image? Did you insert the first background in editing, or was it just the original background against which the model posed? What was it that struck you about the current background and what type of backgrounds did you NOT want?

  Posted: 09/28/2019 20:25:12

Karen Smalley   Karen Smalley
Many thanks for such positive comments .. Ok the first version I posted of this model posing was as it was taken at the time .. Listening to what the judge had said that the background was wrong , I literally took a look at what backgrounds I have either found or purchased ( this was one I have purchased ) and I thought it fitted in perfectly to the era Tony ( the model ) was dressed as .. The issues I had was trying to get Tony to look right size wise in comparison to what the background was .. That was quite a bit bigger ( as it was in landscape layout compared to the portrait layout of the image of Tony ) Very happy on how it looked so i added a bit of exposure and a bit of dodge and burning to then get a similar colouring to Tony as was on the background .. after adding them both together , I then put it back into camera raw again and just did some final tweaks to it till we got this final image x   Posted: 09/29/2019 04:47:55
Witta Priester   Witta Priester
Karen, Good job getting the background in so flawlessly. It works well and adds light, interest, and story. Two thoughts: 1) trying to somewhat separate the top of the hat from the background would perhaps improve the image, and 2) if you use a background that you yourself did not photograph or create, you cannot enter the image into a PSA competition (or likely another other organization's), since the final image is not totally your own work.   Posted: 09/29/2019 08:39:49

Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
Take a look at this site, for an excellent example of Fine Art Photography, along with some freebees (on her other pages). https://www.juliepowellphoto.com/gallery
  Posted: 10/11/2019 09:31:30

Georgianne Giese   Georgianne Giese
What distinguishes an ordinary documentary photo from a 'fine art' photo? I recall years ago, reading about how National Geographic determines which, of tons of photos, they choose to publish. Their editor said that they look beyond photo quality to uniqueness of a photo, amongst all photos of the same subject. Take a look at https://www.facebook.com/newanimalbook/. It's a fun site, but in particular, note the image of the grazing elk and the image of the lion.What distinguishes them from other images of elk and lions? They are unique and in my opinion, make an ordinary photo into fine art, something I personally, would frame and hang in my living room!   Posted: 11/11/2019 08:13:12
J. Lanning Smith   J. Lanning Smith
Agree. Those are some cool shots.   Posted: 11/11/2019 12:00:29

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