Damon Williams  


Blue Eyes Blue Dress by Damon Williams

April 2021 - Blue Eyes Blue Dress

About the Image(s)


Fuji X-E3
18-55 @ 55mm
1/120s
f/4
ISO 400, .
Natural lighting. Cropping, exposure, and a bit of color editing.

I shot this as part of my PSA Individual Photography course about a year ago. It could certainly be more controlled, and...sterile. But, what I like about this image is that despite being 100% candid (I was just having a conversation with my neighbor's grandchild) it is still relatively distraction free.
Attachments area


15 comments posted




John Meiers   John Meiers
You have done a lot better than I did on the portrait section of the PSA Individual Photography course. Especially using natural lighting. Nice job. Do find the objects behind the young lady a bit distracting but still a lot better than what I took. Trying to study more on lighting techniques.   Posted: 04/06/2021 21:40:06



Damon Williams   Damon Williams
Hey, Thanks John. Yeah, the chair back in the background is not ideal. But, then again, it's a candid shot of a kid. At least she's not wearing anything with My Pretty Pony on it or a bunch of glitter. ;)   Posted: 04/06/2021 22:44:30



Emmy Denton   Emmy Denton
What a lovely child! She stands out nicely against the dark red background with her light blue dress and eyes. The back of the chair does draw my attention - with some careful selection you should be able to darken it or clone it out. I suppose that is too obvious;)

It's hard for me to tell if you added a vignette. Perhaps adding a custom one would help darken the chair.

Very captivating photo!   Posted: 04/13/2021 00:39:15
Damon Williams   Damon Williams
Thanks Emmy. You're right. The chair is not ideal. It was meant to be a candid, environmental portrait, and I thought the chair was sufficiently soft to kind of melt into the background, but that appears not to be the case. But, that's why we bring photos to the critical eyes of our DD-mates. No vignette, but that's an interesting idea. Check this out:
I did a vignette, which still didn't eliminate the chair. Then, I used the LrC HSL panel to target the particular color of the chair, and drag it down a bit. Thoughts?   Posted: 04/13/2021 10:59:35



Damon Williams   Damon Williams
  Posted: 04/13/2021 11:00:11
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Damon Williams   Damon Williams
Here's a similar, sharper, but also busier photo. Thoughts?   Posted: 04/13/2021 11:38:36



Damon Williams   Damon Williams
  Posted: 04/13/2021 11:39:24
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Jane Pittenger   Jane Pittenger
I am about to do this module so good to see your take! I think you did great on the lighting to bring out depth with just enough shadowing. Her expression is priceless. It looks as if your focus was on her nose letting the eyes just be the tiniest bit soft but their color with her dress still draws the eye right to them. I agree re the chair especially with it coming out of her head. I like your added vignette and darkening of the chair. The other pose is also sweet and engaging though her nose looks somewhat widened   Posted: 04/13/2021 15:26:00
Damon Williams   Damon Williams
Hey Jane, what are your thoughts on this image? How does the chair impact it?   Posted: 04/13/2021 19:09:52



Damon Williams   Damon Williams
  Posted: 04/13/2021 19:10:08
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Jane Pittenger   Jane Pittenger
The chair works better here. She looks really sad though...as if she might be about to cry   Posted: 04/13/2021 19:38:08
Damon Williams   Damon Williams
She's wasn't sad. Just demure. But, even if she was, does that really change the impact or quality of the photo? Just bringing up a point for discussion.   Posted: 04/13/2021 20:21:45
Jane Pittenger   Jane Pittenger
No I think it is equally effective just very different   Posted: 04/13/2021 20:29:39
Damon Williams   Damon Williams
Thank you for the compliments Jane. I bring this point up mostly just to begin a discussion about how we can separate quality and impact from our own personal biases (I'm not saying that you are biased...any more than we all are).

In my short time in the club environment, I have seen A LOT of bias work its way into the judging and selection process. In my club, if it's fuzzy, has a beak, or has a lollipop in its hand, it does well. Other very well executed (IMHO) images don't.

I think (emphasis on this is just what I think), in order to be able to grow, and evaluate our own work, we need to be able to appreciate and understand images that aren't necessarily to our liking, but are nevertheless well-conceived, well-thought-out, and well executed.

A photo of a squalling kid could be a hit, and have incredible impact, even if the emotion created is quite negative. Just my thoughts...   Posted: 04/13/2021 20:43:28
Jane Pittenger   Jane Pittenger
Agreed   Posted: 04/13/2021 21:23:11



 

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