Emmy Denton  


mountain snow by Emmy Denton

February 2021 - mountain snow

About the Image(s)

Nikon D3200 camera hand held
400 mm lens
1/4000 sec at f? exposure ISO 6400 (this lens is manual and I didn’t capture the f stop - although I try to keep the f stop around 11)

I was looking for mountain sheep and goats (like where’s Waldo) with my 400mm lens but couldn’t find any. No filter was used, just the sun shade provided on the lens. I edited this in LR only. I used the radial filter, graduated filter and adjustment brush to make the foreground pop from the background. It was snowing in the background and the foreground was sunny. My daughter say this photo is meh, but I like the contrast between the snow and the sun. Perhaps I didn’t capture it appropriately. Comments? Its ok you can be brutal ;)

Also what do you think about the overall brightness? Does anyone have any comments on how to calibrate my monitor for brightness. I’ve received many comments from judges that my photos are too dark but I like to keep detail in the whites and I’m still trying to find that sweet spot. I adjust my whites and blacks in Photoshop top get the maximum tonal range on the histogram so I can’t figure out why I would get these comments.


5 comments posted




Damon Williams   Damon Williams
Hey Emmy,
Frankly, I think you have a lot that's technically correct here. I do really appreciate the sharpness, texture, light, and color of the foreground, especially as juxtaposed to the background. I mean, there's just a butt load of detail on the right hand side of the frame, and the eye immediately goes there, even though there's still a lot to see in the background. So, as an exercise in how to get detail at a distance, I'd call this an A.

As for the brightness, well, in lieu of having a calibrated monitor I don't know what else you can do except to expose to the right in your histogram. Of course, I'm open to suggestion. The exposure (brightness) on this image seems perfectly fine to me, and you have to remember that brightness is an element of mood as well. Does this have the mood/feeling you were going for? (rereading this for mistakes, it just occurred to me that you might want to color grade this. If you move the gold highlights toward orange , and the grey shadows toward blue, I think you'll really bump up the mood and the color harmony of the image. Just a thought...)

But, I think it has to considered that (in my observation) groups of photographers have cultures, and tastes, and the group you're dealing with mostly may prefer a particular look, just as a matter of taste. You may want to cater to their tastes, even if it's not what you would normally do to your images. This isn't really disingenuous, IMHO, since it's an exercise in control for you. I mean, the challenge of photography is figuring out how to make the technology produce what you have in your head. Once you can do that, you can produce anything you damn well feel like producing, whether it satisfies anyone else's tastes or not. Give it a shot. Take the challenge of trying to give them what you think they're looking for. Once you can, use that same skill to make what YOU want. In my club, if it isn't fuzzy, on the wing, or smiling at the camera, it doesn't go anywhere (that's a slight exaggeration but there's definitely a preference). So, I know what you're feeling.   Posted: 02/11/2021 20:59:48



Jane Pittenger   Jane Pittenger
Firstly, on my calibrated monitor, the exposure seems perfect. I think Damon has an interesting idea to try with moving the shadows a tad towards blue and the highlights towards gold but be careful re making the snow blue. I like the contrast foreground vs background a lot and you brought out the detail nicely in foreground. My only suggestion is compositionally...the diagonal line is wonderful and I would try to accent it. Maybe crop a little higher bottom so the foreground is coming out of left bottom corner, crop some off the right to make top right of diagonal come out of corner. I don't suppose you have any more of the photo on top so that the tree top wasn't cut off? If not, I would clone out that tree.
I have a slightly different philosophy than Damon re judging. For myself, I fear that if I aimed towards pleasing the judges, I would both lose my passion for photography and also lose touch with my own vision.   Posted: 02/12/2021 13:03:46



Jane Pittenger   Jane Pittenger
Firstly, on my calibrated monitor, the exposure seems perfect. I think Damon has an interesting idea to try with moving the shadows a tad towards blue and the highlights towards gold but be careful re making the snow blue. I like the contrast foreground vs background a lot and you brought out the detail nicely in foreground. My only suggestion is compositionally...the diagonal line is wonderful and I would try to accent it. Maybe crop a little higher bottom so the foreground is coming out of left bottom corner, crop some off the right to make top right of diagonal come out of corner. I don't suppose you have any more of the photo on top so that the tree top wasn't cut off? If not, I would clone out that tree.
I have a slightly different philosophy than Damon re judging. For myself, I fear that if I aimed towards pleasing the judges, I would both lose my passion for photography and also lose touch with my own vision.   Posted: 02/12/2021 13:03:47



Damon Williams   Damon Williams
Hey Emmy,
Frankly, I think you have a lot that's technically correct here. I do really appreciate the sharpness, texture, light, and color of the foreground, especially as juxtaposed to the background. I mean, there's just a butt load of detail on the right hand side of the frame, and the eye immediately goes there, even though there's still a lot to see in the background. So, as an exercise in how to get detail at a distance, I'd call this an A.

As for the brightness, well, in lieu of having a calibrated monitor I don't know what else you can do except to expose to the right in your histogram. Of course, I'm open to suggestion. The exposure (brightness) on this image seems perfectly fine to me, and you have to remember that brightness is an element of mood as well. Does this have the mood/feeling you were going for? (rereading this for mistakes, it just occurred to me that you might want to color grade this. If you move the gold highlights toward orange , and the grey shadows toward blue, I think you'll really bump up the mood and the color harmony of the image. Just a thought...)

But, I think it has to considered that (in my observation) groups of photographers have cultures, and tastes, and the group you're dealing with mostly may prefer a particular look, just as a matter of taste. You may want to cater to their tastes, even if it's not what you would normally do to your images. This isn't really disingenuous, IMHO, since it's an exercise in control for you. I mean, the challenge of photography is figuring out how to make the technology produce what you have in your head. Once you can do that, you can produce anything you damn well feel like producing, whether it satisfies anyone else's tastes or not. Give it a shot. Take the challenge of trying to give them what you think they're looking for. Once you can, use that same skill to make what YOU want. In my club, if it isn't fuzzy, on the wing, or smiling at the camera, it doesn't go anywhere (that's a slight exaggeration but there's definitely a preference). So, I know what you're feeling.   Posted: 02/12/2021 16:18:15



Bernie Groome   Bernie Groome
Hi Emmy, when I first saw your photo, I almost felt like I was on a glass elevator on the upper floors of a high rise building. And them when I looked at the size of the trees in the bottom right, I really felt that way. I think the contrast from the black and white of the left and the color on the right really give a three dimensional effect.   Posted: 02/19/2021 08:36:56



 

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