Renee Schaefer  


Autumn in Arkansas by Renee Schaefer

January 2020 - Autumn in Arkansas

About the Image(s)

Autumn was beautiful when we visited this fall. Except for a small crop, this is straight out of my Sony A6300 using my 18-135 lens.


18 comments posted

Lauren Heerschap   Lauren Heerschap
This image has amazing detail and the subject is lovely. Is it a covered bridge or a mill? I am wondering about the reflections that you can see in the upper pool. If you have Lightroom, you could try a neutral density filter from the bottom up, and you might get more information in the pool. You have balanced this shot nicely, I like the perspective. The sky is a bit hot, so I'd try that filter from the top down too.
Did you have a polarizer on your camera?   Posted: 01/09/2020 14:53:44
Renee Schaefer   Renee Schaefer
I did not have a polarizer on the camera. I don't even think I brought one on this trip, but you are right, I should have used one. The day was pretty overcast. In fact, by the time we left this old mill it was raining.
I do have Lightroom, but am just learning it. When you say filter the sky down from the top, do you mean in Lightroom? I am planning on buying Luminar and I think I could do a lot with the sky using that program.
Thanks for your input.   Posted: 01/09/2020 17:16:47
Lauren Heerschap   Lauren Heerschap
Hi, sorry I meant the graduated filter in Lightroom. In the Develop module, at the top there is a rectangle. Click on it and it attaches to your mouse. Right click on the top of the photo and hold the mouse button as you pull down. It will make two parallel lines that widen. If you also hold down the shift key at that same time it will keep it straight. Most folks use this to darken a blown out sky. The tip I was mentioning is that you can also do the same by pulling UP from the bottom of the photo, and get a graduated filter from the bottom to increase the relections in the water. Give it a try.   Posted: 01/09/2020 23:02:43

Becca Cambridge   Becca Cambridge
Ok, these comments are based on a recent PPI speaker on how photos MIGHT be judged so take with a grain of salt.
This might be judged as a little over saturated. I know, I know, that's how it looked but the judge might think otherwise.
The bench at the top of the photo and the fence could be removed.
Think he said the sky should have some detail and not look blown out even though it might have looked like this.
Also, he said the edges should be "finished" like in having a border. Will need to hear what others say about these "suggestions" as I'm still trying to grapple with them myself.
I love the color and the detail in the mill and the limbs of the walkway. I think this is a pretty photo.   Posted: 01/10/2020 09:29:44
Jon Allanson   Jon Allanson
Having been on the judging circuit for many years, I have recently become quite concerned that many of new judges coming on to it have a relatively limited experience of photography, only based on club competitions, and consequently criticize anything that does not fit to their narrow field of experience.
The change to digital has changed the desire of many from cropping almost every image to cloning out something instead, irrespective of whether the image requires that truth to be maintained as in Record, PJ and NH subjects.
Listen to what is said, but don't regard it as absolutely definitive, as most judges have a few pet ideas.
I would suggest when preparing images, look around the outside of the frame for intrusions and distractions, and also any other elements in the image that could detract from the main subject.
Remember that photographic composition rules are often best broken, as it is the final image that matters.
  Posted: 01/12/2020 05:44:16
Becca Cambridge   Becca Cambridge
I LOVE YOU!!!!! Thanks for your perperspective as always! I can NOT tell you how bummed I was to hear this speaker. It seemed that all his suggestions resulted in images that looked either studio staged or converted into a graphic design. I was so bummed and vowed never to enter any competition.
Thank you for the voice of reason. I really do love you.   Posted: 01/12/2020 12:12:49

Oliver Morton   Oliver Morton
(Groups 5 & 62)
Renee, when I saw this image I immediately thought of the beautiful jig saw puzzles that my family put together many years ago. It's lovely. I really like the composition. The mill is nicely balanced by the colorful trees on the left. And, the entire image is anchored by the dam at the bottom. Very well done!

I agree with Becca that removing the bench and fence at the top might be beneficial... as well as darkening the sky a bit. Alternatively, you might consider Luminar's Sky Replacement capability if you have some rain clouds in your archives.

Excellent job and a lovely photograph!

  Posted: 01/11/2020 16:52:04

Jon Allanson   Jon Allanson
Your cropping of the image has nicely placed the mill on the right-hand third, and the walkway across the top of the leat helps lead the eye to the mill doorway. The sky is the lightest part of the image and so attracts the eye, and once you have noticed the bench and fence keeps going there, I would suggest cloning them out. I would also as Lauren suggests darken the sky down- In Photoshop I would use gradient on a levels adjustment layer in which he output slider is lowered from the 255 position. I like the degree of saturation, it can vary considerably due to the lighting conditions it tends to be low in bright sunlight and to increase in dull damp weather or with the use of a polariser.

  Posted: 01/12/2020 04:30:28

Beverly Caine   Beverly Caine
(Groups 48 & 80)
Visiting from 48 & 80.
This is a beautiful image; however, I did find the sky and fence a bit distracting so, I cropped the image at the top of the house and then eliminated the other stuff up there with content-aware fill. See my result.   Posted: 01/18/2020 11:05:31
Comment Image

Beverly Caine   Beverly Caine
(Groups 48 & 80)
Visiting from 48 & 80.
This is a beautiful image; however, I did find the sky and fence a bit distracting so, I cropped the image at the top of the house and then eliminated the other stuff up there with content-aware fill. See my result.   Posted: 01/18/2020 11:05:36
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Lauren Heerschap   Lauren Heerschap
Beverly, I think that cropping is not a good solution for a blown out sky. This crop tops off the building, and that does not give balance to the photo. Instead I would remove the bench and work on toning down the highlights, keeping the sky. Using content-aware to fill the sky with trees is tricky - you will find that the branches and leaves are going to give away what you did if you are not extremely careful.
  Posted: 01/21/2020 10:57:30

Beverly Caine   Beverly Caine
(Groups 48 & 80)
  Posted: 01/18/2020 11:05:38

Jan van Leijenhorst   Jan van Leijenhorst
This is a very pleasant, almost comforting image of a rural scene. Beautifully done. I agree with others that I would darken the sky a bit (don't crop)as it distracts from the main area.
I agree with Jon on the comments he made about judges. I just sat through a presentation at my camera club that was basically on how to please judges. I rarely submit images in competitions because: I photograph for my myself (keeping viewers in mind) and I do not photograph for judges.   Posted: 01/20/2020 14:02:48

Jan van Leijenhorst   Jan van Leijenhorst
This is a very pleasant, almost comforting image of a rural scene. Beautifully done. I agree with others that I would darken the sky a bit (don't crop)as it distracts from the main area.
I agree with Jon on the comments he made about judges. I just sat through a presentation at my camera club that was basically on how to please judges. I rarely submit images in competitions because: I photograph for my myself (keeping viewers in mind) and I do not photograph for judges.   Posted: 01/20/2020 14:05:03

Danny Dunne   Danny Dunne
Renee, I like to review an image as it is presented and to identify the elements of a good image. I would recommend the PSA Image Analysis course.
In my opinion this is a really good composition. i think the building balances nicely with the coloured trees on the left. The stone wall, path and bridges lead right to the door of the building. It seems to me that the the colours are quite natural as none jump out as over saturated
I don't think the seat is a problem, it is part of the story.
Yes the sky could be adjusted. I use Photoshop curves adjustment layer with masking and controlled painting in of adjustment. (may ways to do this - all are right!)   Posted: 01/20/2020 22:05:34

Brad Ashbrook   Brad Ashbrook
The composition of this image is excellent with an interesting subject matter. I think the colors look very natural and didn't even think twice if they were over saturated. The only challenge you have is the top part of the image which is blown out just enough. If you did a sky replacement, it would need to be darker clouds as you no shadows per say so no sun was shining when you took the photograph.

Don't get me started with judges, I stopped entering competitions a long time ago. I enjoy exercises like this where we are simply giving our opinion. First and foremost, enjoy photography for yourself regardless of what some judge says.   Posted: 01/21/2020 09:26:50

Lauren Heerschap   Lauren Heerschap
I agree with the recommendation of the PSA Judges Analysis course. It is very helpful for your own images and to get a balance on judging photos.





  Posted: 01/21/2020 10:54:35

Beverly Caine   Beverly Caine
(Groups 48 & 80)
You could try Luminar 4 for the sky. My husband has had some great success with it. I haven't tried it yet.   Posted: 01/21/2020 11:17:55

 

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